30 May

Cosmos 3.0 with Neil deGrasse Tyson Arrives Tonight at 8 PM, Somewhat Dented

first_img“A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Physics, Earth & Space Cosmos 3.0 with Neil deGrasse Tyson Arrives Tonight at 8 PM, Somewhat DentedDavid KlinghofferMarch 9, 2020, 12:09 PM But the charismatic Tyson does return as host in “Possible Worlds.” And Evolution News will be tuning in to see how he performs.Mandatory in Schools?Our staff’s critique and analysis of Cosmos 2.0 appeared in book form as The Unofficial Guide to Cosmos: Fact and Fiction in Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Landmark Science Series, which I edited. Many of the themes of Cosmos, in both its iterations, were examined at much greater scholarly depth by Discovery Institute science historian Michael Keas in his book Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. Our motivation in this work was partly the concern that the series would end up being used in schools. The same worry might well apply to Cosmos 3.0. As a commenter on the trailer enthuses, it is a “A documentary that should be mandatory at school.” Says another, “Cosmos should be made mandatory in school curriculum[s].”The trailer is well done, and no doubt the production values for the season as a whole will be high. Tyson on screen is never less than an enjoyable personality. You can watch, too, at 8 pm/7 pm Central. Let me know what you think!Image: Host Neil deGrasse Tyson glimpsed in a screenshot from the trailer for Cosmos 3.0, “Possible Worlds.”  Image: Host Neil deGrasse Tyson glimpsed in a screenshot from the trailer for Cosmos 3.0, “Possible Worlds.” The third season of the Cosmos franchise arrives tonight on Fox and National Geographic, somewhat dented in my opinion by the second season’s loose approach to the scientific and historical facts. At one point, due to personal controversies around host Neil deGrasse Tyson, it seemed uncertain that Cosmos 3.0, “Possible Worlds,” would be released at all. But here it is at last.The second season (2014) spun a misleading narrative celebrating the triumph of rational, secular scientific culture over benighted, supposedly irrational and anti-science religion. That the new season debuts amid a culture-wide panic attack over a little-known virus, complete with a stock market crash and toilet-paper hoarding, is not what you would call the best timing.Oddly, in the trailer, Dr. Tyson is barely glimpsed, and not heard at all. Instead, the narrating here is all done by Carl Sagan, star of the iconic, original Cosmos (1980), who died in 1996: Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesiscenter_img Recommended A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All TagsCarl SagancoronavirusCosmos (series)Cosmos: Possible WorldsFox Broadcasting CompanyhoardingMichael KeasNational Geographic ChannelNeil deGrasse Tysonstock marketThe Unofficial Guide to CosmosUnbelievable,Trending Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share David KlinghofferSenior Fellow and Editor, Evolution NewsDavid Klinghoffer is a Senior Fellow at Discovery Institute and the editor of Evolution News & Science Today, the daily voice of Discovery Institute’s Center for Science & Culture, reporting on intelligent design, evolution, and the intersection of science and culture. Klinghoffer is also the author of six books, a former senior editor and literary editor at National Review magazine, and has written for the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Seattle Times, Commentary, and other publications. Born in Santa Monica, California, he graduated from Brown University in 1987 with an A.B. magna cum laude in comparative literature and religious studies. David lives near Seattle, Washington, with his wife and children.Follow DavidProfileTwitter Sharelast_img

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