24 Aug

Southeast trollers frustrated with low king salmon quota

first_imgEconomy | Fisheries | Government | Southeast | State GovernmentSoutheast trollers frustrated with low king salmon quotaJuly 3, 2015 by Rachel Waldholz, KCAW Share:About 70 people gathered in Sitka’s Harrigan Centennial Hall to hear from Dale Kelley, of the Alaska Trollers Association. (Photo by Rachel Waldholz/KCAW)Harbors emptied throughout Southeast this week as fishermen headed out for the beginning of the summer troll season. July 1 marks the annual start of the summer’s first king salmon opener — the most lucrative time of the year for many trollers. Signs point to a banner year for king salmon.But Southeast fishermen say they’re not getting their fair share of those kings. The state of Alaska has been locked in a fight with its neighbors to the south over how many fish the fleet can catch.For now Alaska seems to have lost, and that has led to calls to change the system.It’s been an uncertain, unsettled spring for many Southeast salmon fishermen.“It’s been real frustrating because nobody knows what’s going to happen, and usually by now, the quota’s been announced two months ago,” said Sitka troller Bert Bergman.That would be the annual king salmon quota. Usually, fishermen have two numbers in hand before the summer season starts: an estimate of how many kings are out there and how many they’re allowed to catch. This year, with the season already underway, they don’t have either.“Nobody knows how many fish we’re catching, or why the number’s low, or how we got this way,” Bergman said. “And basically we’ve had to guess, and dock rumors have ruled the day instead of reason and facts.”That uncertainty came from the Pacific Salmon Commission, which implements the U.S. – Canada Pacific Salmon Treaty. Each year, the commission has to come up with an estimate of king salmon abundance, determine how many kings Alaska fishermen can catch, and decide how many will pass on to Canada, Washington and Oregon. This year the Commission deadlocked over those figures leading to months of wrangling. Days before the summer opening, fishermen weren’t sure they’d be fishing at all.Finally, in late June, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced that it would open the summer king salmon fishery, and it would be managed assuming low king salmon abundance. But the state explicitly said it believes that estimate is wrong.“I wouldn’t say that we chose this course of action,” said Charlie Swanton, Alaska’s representative on the salmon commission. He said Alaska was backed into a corner after representatives from the Pacific Northwest and federal government threatened to take the state to court.But, Swanton said, it’s not the end of the conversation.“It’s hardened my resolve to turn around and find some solutions, such that Alaskans get their fair share of the fish that migrate by our coastal communities,” he said.Alaska believes the model used by the commission is deeply flawed. Last year was a huge year for king salmon in Southeast, and the winter troll fishery was also strong.  Meanwhile, forecasts are calling for major returns to the Columbia River basin. All of that suggests a big year for Chinook, Swanton said.But even though Alaska didn’t win any concessions this year, the commission has agreed to revisit its model before next year’s fishery.Dale Kelley of the Alaska Trollers Association says that change can’t come soon enough.“We’ve had 30 years of trying to pay for the sins of the south on habitat destruction,” she said. “We’ve cared for fish and repeatedly made sacrifices on behalf of our industry and the region just to rebuild runs that are through the roof.”And now, she said, Alaskans should be benefitting from those rebuilt stocks. She said trollers don’t mind taking fewer fish in years of actual low abundance. But she warns that when the model isn’t reliable, it undermines the entire management system.Though the Department of Fish and Game hasn’t announced a quota, Kelley fears Alaska sport and commercial fishermen will be allowed about 237,000 kings this year, down from nearly 440,000 last year.“They’re just busting our chops with this quota, this up and down thing,” she said. “There’s no sustainability, no sense of security that they know what they’re getting year to year.”Bergman said it’s clear the process is not working.“I’ve never seen as many king salmon in the ocean as I’ve seen now, and I’ve got four generations of trollers in my family,” he said. “To not get part of that fish when we’ve made all the sacrifices to help rebuild the runs, and we help pay for the hatcheries, and then to not get some of that feels like we’ve been sold out by the southern states and the National Marine Fisheries Service and NOAA.”But for now, he says, he’s got no choice. Whatever the quota is, he’s fishing it.“I’m gonna just take a lot of ice and listen to the radio and see what happens,” he said.Share this story:last_img read more

13 Jul

Mobile World Congress 2015: Google aims to launch its own mobile network

first_img Mobile World Congress 2015: Google aims to launch its own mobile network Express KCS whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity Weekzenherald.com20 Rules Genghis Khan’s Army Had To Live Byzenherald.comForbesThese 10 Colleges Have Produced The Most Billionaire AlumniForbesGameday NewsNASCAR Drivers Salaries Finally ReleasedGameday NewsMagellan TimesThis Is Why The Roy Rogers Museum Has Been Closed For GoodMagellan TimesWorldemandCanal Drained For First Time And They Find ThisWorldemandPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedy whatsapp Monday 2 March 2015 8:48 pmcenter_img Google is set to launch its own US mobile network “in the next few months” as part of a move to spur innovation among operators.The search giant’s vice president of android and chrome, Sundar Pichai, told telecoms executives at Mobile World Congress that Google would rent network capacity and launch a consumer-facing network to “show what’s possible”.He gave few details but highlighted features like calls that automatically reconnect if someone drops on one end and handing off voice calls from the mobile network to household wifi as possible experiments Google could run on its own network.“I think we’re at the stage where we need to think of hardware, software, and connectivity together,” said Pichai. “Especially with things like watches. We don’t intend to be a carrier at scale, and we’re working with existing partners. You’ll see some of our ideas come to fruition in the next few months.”Pichai described Google’s network as “small scale” compared to the larger American operators and did not comment on whether the plans would extend outside the US.He also denied the move would be seen as a threat by the likes of Verizon and AT&T. Share Read This Next’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofAmazon roars for MGM’s lion, paying $8.45 billion for studio behind JamesFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofHomemade Tomato Soup: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofWhat to Know About ‘Loki’ Ahead of Disney+ Premier on June 9Family ProofChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofBaked Sesame Salmon: Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof Show Comments ▼ Tags: Google Mobile World Congress 2016last_img read more

20 Jun

Lidl announces new partnerships with two Laois-based suppliers

first_imgHome News Lidl announces new partnerships with two Laois-based suppliers News Electric Picnic WhatsApp TAGS12 AcresBallykilcavan BreweryLidl Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Previous articleHSE provide positive update on Covid-19 situation at Portlaoise HospitalNext articleDepartment of Education to give ‘particular focus’ to incoming Sixth Year students Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Lidl announces new partnerships with two Laois-based suppliers Lidl have announced details of new partnerships with two Laois-based suppliers.Lidl Ireland’s successful supplier development programme, Kickstart, has returned for the fourth consecutive year bringing the retailer’s customers 68 exciting new Irish-made products, while supplies last.The programme, which is backed by Bord Bia, is designed to support small and medium Irish food and drink businesses grow their brand and build their supply network, particularly during this time of economic uncertainty. Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival By Alan Hartnett – 24th July 2020 Facebook Twittercenter_img News Electric Picnic Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest This year’s programme features two Laois-based brands: Ballykilcavan Brewery and 12 Acres Brewing Company.Since 2017, Lidl has invested €1 million in the programme and this year, 33 Irish suppliers, including two Laois-based, have been given the opportunity to showcase their products on the shelves of all 202 Lidl stores across Ireland and Northern Ireland from Thursday July 30.Ballykilcavan Brewing is owned by David Walsh-Kemis and is based in Stradbally.It will be bringing a choice of two beers to Lidl’s shelves from Thursday July 30.A family run business, Ballykilcavan Brewing source their brewing water from their own well, which was specially divined in the 18th century farmyard just outside the brewery building.Lidl will be stocking their refreshing Red Ale and Bawn Pale Ale for €2.99 each, the perfect drink to enjoy on a warm summer’s evening.12 Acres Brewing Company was established in 2014 in Killeshin by brothers Patrick, Ian, Barry and Rory McDonald.12 Acres Brewing Company is a multi-award-winning Artisan Farm Microbrewery based on a family farm in South Laois.12 Acres was the first Irish microbrewery to provide genuine traceability for the malting barley used to brew their beer.Brewed from their own malted barley grown on their own farm and pure spring water from deep beneath the same land the barley is grown on, 12 Acres brings real Irish craft beer with unique provenance and genuine traceability from the ground to your glass to the Irish market.Their 440ml can range which will be available in all Lidl stores from July 30 and includes Far Side Hazy IPA 5.1%, Winter is Coming, Oatmeal Porter 5.2% and Make Hay – Session IPA 3.8% (€2.79 each).SEE ALSO – HSE provide positive update on Covid-19 situation at Portlaoise Hospital Facebook Pinterestlast_img read more

18 Jun

Advanced markets growing: OECD

Economic growth has picked up in the world’s advanced economies, but this is being trumped by the fact that growth in emerging markets is slowing, says the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). In its latest economic assessment, the OECD says that growth “is proceeding at encouraging rates in North America, Japan and the UK”. It says that the euro area is out of recession, but that output remains weak in a number of countries. James Langton Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Companies Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development However, growth has also slowed in some of the large emerging economies, it says. Rising global bond yields have “fuelled market instability and capital outflows in a number of major emerging economies, such as India and Indonesia,” it says. And, as the emerging economies now account for a large share of the global economy, their slowdown “points to sluggish near-term growth globally”, it says. For Canada, the OECD says that economic growth “is projected to strengthen through 2013 and 2014, driven by business investment, which will benefit from low capital costs, still high commodity prices and improving confidence. External demand will also contribute, thanks to expanding US and non-OECD markets and a depreciating exchange rate.” It sees 1.4% growth this year, and 2.3% next year. “Household spending will be supported by easy monetary policy yet restrained by tightening mortgage rules and deleveraging. A consolidating public sector will slow growth as well,” it adds. Monetary policy will have to become less expansionary by the latter half of 2014 to contain inflationary pressures, it says. “In the meantime, any aggravation of housing price pressures should be addressed by further prudential measures. Fiscal consolidation should continue as planned, but the automatic stabilisers should be allowed to operate,” it says. “The gradual pick-up in momentum in the advanced economies is encouraging but a sustainable recovery is not yet firmly established,” said OECD deputy chief economist, Jorgen Elmeskov. “Major risks remain. The euro area is still vulnerable to renewed financial markets, banking and sovereign debt tensions. High levels of debt in some emerging markets have increased their vulnerability to financial shocks. And a renewal of brinkmanship over fiscal policy in the US could weaken confidence and trigger new episodes of financial turmoil.” “Continued support for demand is still needed to make sure recovery takes hold, and it remains vital that this be complemented by structural reforms to boost growth, rebalance the global economy and avoid a ratcheting-up of structural unemployment,” Elmeskov added. The OECD says that tackling high unemployment is crucial and must be a key focus of government action. Unemployment rates are still far above pre-crisis levels in the U.S. and Europe, and it says, “to avoid high rates getting entrenched even as a recovery takes hold governments must implement effective training and activation policies, backed by support for stronger demand.” “Reforming tax-benefit systems should improve work incentives while targeted measures are needed for vulnerable groups such as jobless young people outside the training and education system,” it adds. The OECD also says that public finances have been improving in most advanced economies, with the exception of Japan, but that fiscal consolidation policies must continue. “Such policies need to be better designed, however, to protect the most vulnerable in society, to build public support for necessary structural reforms and to prioritise spending to help get people back to work,” it says. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media read more

16 Jun

FedNor investments support innovation and business growth in Nipissing-Timiskaming and across Northern Ontario

first_imgFedNor investments support innovation and business growth in Nipissing-Timiskaming and across Northern Ontario From: FedNorBackgrounderTerry Sheehan, Parliamentary Secretary to the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages and Minister responsible for FedNor, announced a FedNor investment of more than $1 million for three strategic initiatives that support innovation and business development and growth in the Nipissing-Timiskaming region as well as Northern Ontario.Terry Sheehan, Parliamentary Secretary to the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages and Minister responsible for FedNor, announced a FedNor investment of more than $1 million for three strategic initiatives that support innovation and business development and growth in the Nipissing-Timiskaming region as well as Northern Ontario.Nipissing-Timiskaming initiatives supported by FedNorFPInnovations (FPI)$525,600With $525,600 in FedNor funding, FPI will deliver the Ontario Forest Sector Capacity Building initiative aimed at encouraging innovation and technology uptake within Northern and Indigenous forestry businesses. This strategic investment will support Northern Ontario-based research staff and relevant FPI support staff in connecting research directly to forest sector businesses, helping them to build their technical and human resources capacity. The project goals are to implement innovation, foster investment, grow skilled employment, and achieve a tangible economic impact in Northern and Indigenous communities.Emile Janveaux Forest Products Ltd.$381,500A repayable FedNor contribution of $381,500 will assist Emile Janveaux Forest Products to purchase equipment to improve operational efficiency in the forest. The logging company, based in Mattawa, currently processes treetops manually. Upgrading to a mechanical process will increase efficiency as the felling, topping and delimbing would be done by one machine. As a result, this initiative will improve the company’s competitiveness, while enhancing on-the-job safety for its employees.Canadore College$101,000FedNor funding of $101,000 will enable Canadore College to assist with the pre-commercialization of a device that will offer small businesses and social organizations a user-friendly, cost-effective sterilization method to comply with public health and safety regulations. Canadore’s Innovation Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Prototyping (ICAMP) is working in partnership with FEME Innovations from North Bay who came up with the creative prototype to tackle the coronavirus health crisis. Its invention, dubbed the UltraViolet Qube-it, was developed in response to a COVID-19 Challenge sponsored by the Brazilian mining company, Vale, and is one of a dozen winning proposals from around the globe. The device could be used to sterilize items such as identification badges, pagers, shoes, masks, toys, just to name a few. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:advanced manufacturing, Brazil, Canada, coronavirus, Economic Development, efficiency, employment, Government, health and safety, Indigenous, innovation, Investment, manufacturing, public health, Small Business, sterilization, technology, ultravioletlast_img read more

16 Jun

Community events to flourish in Parramatta with funding boost

first_imgCommunity events to flourish in Parramatta with funding boost A number of new and exciting public events are set to pop up in the City of Parramatta as Council relaunches its Community Events Grants Program.Community groups and not-for-profits are invited to apply for a share of up to $70,000 in funding to run low-cost or free events that will help revitalise the City and attract visitors.The Community Events Grants program was not offered in 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions.“I am delighted that we can welcome back the diverse range of events that our great City is renowned for, after a year of tough COVID-19 restrictions,” City of Parramatta Lord Mayor Cr Bob Dwyer said.“Through our Community Events Grants Program, we hope to provide residents and visitors with more opportunities to connect and celebrate while also supporting our City’s recovery from the pandemic.”The grants program aims to establish and encourage new events which provide social, recreational and cultural benefits to people across the Parramatta Local Government Area.Community groups and not-for-profits are invited to apply for a share of up to $70,000 in funding to run low-cost or free events that will help revitalise the City and attract visitors.The Community Events Grants program was not offered in 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions.“I am delighted that we can welcome back the diverse range of events that our great City is renowned for, after a year of tough COVID-19 restrictions,” City of Parramatta Lord Mayor Cr Bob Dwyer said.“Through our Community Events Grants Program, we hope to provide residents and visitors with more opportunities to connect and celebrate while also supporting our City’s recovery from the pandemic.”The grants program aims to establish and encourage new events which provide social, recreational and cultural benefits to people across the Parramatta Local Government Area.Community groups and not-for-profits are invited to apply for a share of up to $70,000 in funding to run low-cost or free events that will help revitalise the City and attract visitors.The Community Events Grants program was not offered in 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions.“I am delighted that we can welcome back the diverse range of events that our great City is renowned for, after a year of tough COVID-19 restrictions,” City of Parramatta Lord Mayor Cr Bob Dwyer said.“Through our Community Events Grants Program, we hope to provide residents and visitors with more opportunities to connect and celebrate while also supporting our City’s recovery from the pandemic.”The grants program aims to establish and encourage new events which provide social, recreational and cultural benefits to people across the Parramatta Local Government Area. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:community, council, covid-19, Government, grants program, Local Government, pandemic, Parramatta, Parramatta Councillast_img read more

15 Jun

Subaru shows off a NSFW Forester concept in Singapore

first_imgA British collector has sold his personal set of Matchbox cars for over half a million dollars. Simon Hope, founder of British car auction company H & H Classics, has been collecting the toy cars since he was a child, receiving them from family members on birthdays and Christmases. Mostly the die-cast vehicles were kept in their boxes, as Hope’s grandmother would not allow their hard wheels on her prized mahogany dining table. That was probably frustrating for the young Hope, but, boy, has it paid off.  Recently, the 68-year-old decided it was finally time to part ways with his prized toy cars, so he sent them to auction. Experts told him his pristine set of nearly 3,000 toys was likely the best in the world, and when all was said and done, Hope was handed a cool £300,000 ($510,900) for the lot. “It was only when I got older that I realized there was actually a collecting scene out there and information on rarer versions and colors,” Hope told H&H Classics. “I never took part in that scene, preferring to simply track down the ones I wanted in perfect (or as near as possible) condition. It just grew and generally they were bought with amounts of money not missed at the time.”RELATED COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS Trending Videos We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. The most valuable car in the group was a lime green ERF dropside truck, which fetched £7,000 ($11,900) at the auction.   Hot Wheels get a modern update with two new digital offerings Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” ‹ Previous Next ›center_img RELATED TAGSFlexClassic CarsClassic Cars & TrucksNew VehiclesFlex Trending in Canada PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever See More Videos advertisement This 25,000-piece Hot Wheels collection is for sale for six figures Julian Royse of the toy auction house Vectis says the collection had “the biggest range of any I’ve seen,” including many valuable models from the ’70s, which, according to Royse, have seen a recent spike in value. last_img read more

13 Jun

Cantina Toblino Awarded Best Sweet Wine Producer of Italy

first_img TAGSCantina ToblinoConsumerGambero Rosso ReddIt Previous articleWatch Brilliance Come to Life for Revolutionary Wine, Beer & Spirit Makers in the Paso Robles, CA Film “Tin City” – Available on Video for the HolidaysNext articleHeavensake Wins “Best Sake 2019” at San Francisco International Wine Competition Press Release Pinterest Twitter Facebook Email Share Home Industry News Releases Cantina Toblino Awarded Best Sweet Wine Producer of ItalyIndustry News ReleasesCantina Toblino Awarded Best Sweet Wine Producer of ItalyBy Press Release – November 19, 2019 241 0 Linkedin AdvertisementPassion. Respect. Quality. People. Tradition. Patience. Since 1960 Cantina Toblino brings all these elements into its wines. More than fifty years ago, in the beautiful region of Valle dei Laghi in Trentino, a small group of local wine growers joined together in a cooperative, at the time devoted to the production of Schiava and Nosiola based wines. Soon after, the wine growers noticed the ageing potential of Nosiola grape variety, especially for the production of a traditional sweet wine called Vino Santo Trentino. In the early 70s, Cantina Toblino bottled its first vintage of Vino Santo Trentino 1965. And since then the tradition has never change.Over the time the production techniques for the Vino Santo Trentino have changed leading to great improvements in terms of quality. A wine that’s a product of waiting, suspended between tradition and sustainability. Vino Santo Trentino is a wine that requires time, foresight, a wine that looks to the past but it’s projected towards the future. In the past, the Vino Santo Trentino was considered an elixir, a corroborant, a tonic for everyone. Nowadays, it has been awarded the prestigious awards of 3 Bicchieri and Best Italian Sweet Wine by Gambero Rosso.Vino Santo is made with Nosiola, a native grape variety from Trentino, expressed at its highest levels of excellence in Valle dei Laghi, a unique terroir devoted to its production. Ripe, dry bunches of Nosiola harvested in mid-October are carefully spread on racks called Arèle, thus favoring the slow natural withering that lasts by tradition until Holy Week, thanks to the constant ventilation by the wind Ora del Garda from the south and Pelèr from the north. The drying process is completed by the noble rot (Botrytis Cinerea) that develops inside the berry accentuating dehydration, favoring the concentration of sugars and producing a unique bouquet.After the longest natural drying in the world (6-7 months) the pressing is carried out, which takes place by centuries of tradition during Holy Week, from which the precious must of Vino Santo is obtained, just over 15 liters of 100 Kg of selected grapes. Once the pressing is complete, fermentation begins, which can last up to 2 or 3 years due to the high concentration of sugars. Vino Santo continues its refinement for over 10 years in French oak barrels.A bright amber color with golden reflections. On the nose, Vino Santo offers a bouquet of incredible complexity and elegance, with clear flavors of overripe fruit, jam, honey and yeasts. The taste is pleasantly sweet, round and of long persistence, with the freshness that goes to balance the important residual sugar making it harmonious and not cloying.Vino Santo is a never ending story. It can further refine in the bottle for decades, thus proving to be one of the most long-lived wines ever, capable of giving emotions even 50 years after the harvest.As Carlo De Biasi said when he received the award of Best Sweet Wine of Italy by Gambero Rosso in Rome on October 26th: “Vino Santo is the true heritage of this valley. Made from nosiola grapes, although in recent years this grape has grown less and less, preferring Chardonnay and Pinot Noir for the production of outstanding Trento DOCs. Our winery has continued focusing on the native Trentino grape and, perhaps also for this reason, for some some time now, our winemakers have resumed cultivating nosiola, allowing us to reach outstanding results that reward them for their commitment and efforts.”Advertisement last_img read more

27 May

Bullock Signs Flathead Water Compact

first_imgHELENA — Gov. Steve Bullock on Friday signed a bill containing the last and most contentious of seven tribal water compacts in Montana.The Democratic governor signed Senate Bill 262 surrounded by about 150 supporters, including bill sponsor Sen. Chas Vincent and Tribal Chairman Vernon Finley.The historic measure, decades in the making, details a water use agreement among the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the state and federal governments.Congress will take up the compact next. State attorneys say it could be years before the agreement is approved by Congress and moves to the tribes for implementationVincent helped re-negotiate the deal after he and other lawmakers in the 2013 session shot down a compact that was seen as less friendly to non-tribal irrigators.The agreement now includes a delivery entitlement that ensures non-tribal farmers and ranchers continue to receive the amount of water they have historically used, and a provision requiring the tribes to share water during droughts.Vincent, a Libby Republican, said compromises made by the CSKT Tribal Council made it possible for him and other lawmakers to support and pass the compact.“Without their willingness to sit down and listen to our concerns and agree to our changes, we would not be here today,” Vincent said, thanking Finley and the tribes.He and Rep. Steve Fitzpatrick, R-Great Falls, who carried the bill in the House, said the tribes made concessions that might not have been necessary if they had instead asked a court to recognize their time immemorial right to use water.“That’s basically the whole agreement — let’s share the resources and let’s be good neighbors and let’s work together for a common goal,” Finley said.Of the 34 U.S. states with tribal reservations, Vincent said Montana is the only one that has negotiated water rights outside of court.“We’re kind of the golden child of western water law in a lot of ways,” Vincent said after SB262 passed the House on April 16. “In dealing with these federal reserve rights, we have chosen to negotiate and settle rather than argue for 10 years in court.”A lawsuit filed Monday seeking to restrain the governor from signing the bill was pending at the time of the ceremony on Friday. The eight irrigators who filed the claim spoke against the compact throughout the legislative vetting process, saying they would lose water if the tribes are granted oversight of the commodity.“There is no underlying trick that we’re trying to pull,” Finley said. “My hope is that history will let them finally understand that that’s the case and they won’t keep wasting their money on frivolous lawsuits.” Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

27 May

Kalispell Officials Say Parkline Trail Over Budget Due to Rising Costs

first_img Email City officials are working to allocate additional funds for the Kalispell Parkline, a multi-use path that will replace the railroad tracks, after receiving two bids for the project, which will be $2.5 million over budget due to the rising costs of materials and labor. If funded, the project would be completed by the end of 2022. At an April 26 council work session, officials brainstormed alternate sources to fund the remainder of the baseline of the project, which would include ripping out the railroad tracks, building the trail, lighting, converting a bridge, street crossings, lights and historical signage, which are the minimum requirements to meet the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant obligations. Mayor Johnson and some councilors were concerned the standards were too restrictive and compared the guidelines to HOA guidelines. “Certainly things have changed,” Development Services Director Jarod Nygren said. “It could have been worse just from the things I’m hearing from developers with cost and labor and materials.” In addition to the base bid, there are eight additives for the project, which include seeding and irrigation, lighting, U.S. Highway 2 bridge improvements, first spare conduit, second spare conduit, site furnishings, west end at Meridian and plaza map etching. Councilors will review the contractor’s bid proposals at the May 3 council meeting. Officials have identified seeding and irrigation as the first priority, which is planned for the initial installation along with the base of the project, costing an additional $938,065 with all additives totaling $1,514,204. Councilor Sid Daoud expressed concern that the standards would be unattainable for some businesses. “That would give us $2.5 million,” Russell said. “How would this be perceived from someone looking from the outside wanting to develop a piece of property?” Johnson said. “Is it too relaxed, is it too restrictive, is it too specific, is it not specific enough?” While the seeding and irrigation wouldn’t necessarily be critical infrastructure, city officials emphasized its importance to be completed with the path installation. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. “The Samaritan House has a long history of serving folks in the area,” Executive Director Chris Krager said. “We operate the homeless shelter, some other types of housing including some real affordable permanent apartments … The Samaritan House is also a community housing development organization, and that’s the role that helps us in pursuit of the CDBG planning grant. We serve 1,300 or 1,400 people annually in the shelter and our other housing, and in the kitchen and café (we serve) three meals a day with 38,000 to 39,000 meals annually.”center_img The Montana Main Street Program grant allowed the BID to hire A&E Architects to develop the design standards to “establish a unique and identifiable character of downtown.” The remaining additives will eventually be included in the project as funds become available. City officials plan to host council meetings open to the public in the council’s chambers starting June 7. “I think the council and possibly the community would be a little disappointed to only have that immediate stretch through there and not really build out the full green space and the usability and the desirability of it,” Russell said. The expansion would include single-occupant sleeping rooms, family dwelling units, a multi-use kitchen and dining space, and an administrative area. “I think the vision of what you can do with the Samaritan House property is incredible and I’m excited to see this move forward,” Mayor Mark Johnson said. “One of the side effects, I fear, is we are only able to cater downtown to the businesses that can afford these upgrades and the design put forth, Daoud said. “We might be creating a different downtown than we have now as far as the businesses we have there … it’s kind of an economic burden.” In addition, the council discussed downtown historic district design standards after the Downtown Business Improvement District (BID) received a grant to develop the standards for downtown Kalispell. Standards include pedestrian-friendly urban site design and historical architectural form, material and colors “reflective of Kalispell’s period of significance (1891-1960).” Review would be required for new buildings, additions, façade improvements and signs 20 square feet or larger. Separately, Samaritan House officials have plans to expand the homeless shelter facility on Second Street West to add four multifamily residential buildings with 14 units to address affordable housing in Kalispell. The units would be available to rent for “very low-income individuals and families.” Samaritan House officials are requesting $50,000 from the CDBG grant, which would facilitate a one-to-three cash match of $16,700. The City of Kalispell would be a sponsor of the planning grant and would make no financial contributions to the facility. City Manager Doug Russell proposed using $525,000 in previously resolved Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) funds; the 20% reserve amount from the general fund, which officials estimate will be around $700,000; and $1 million from Old School Station closeouts. The city received two bids on April 22, the lowest from Sandry Construction with a base bid of $6,473,171, including construction administration. The engineer’s base bid and construction administration estimate, which officials say was gauged several years ago, is $5,150,023.last_img read more