19 Jul

Developing innovative foam to help seal wounds quickly

first_img Source:https://www.psu.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 25 2018Every second counts for those with life-threatening injuries, especially when help is far away. A new grant will help Penn State researchers develop an innovative foam that helps seal wounds quickly — whether on the battlefield, in rural areas or in other isolated locations far from hospitals.The three-year, $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command will support the development and testing of the foam, which will expand and turn into a gel when applied to a wound. The pressure from the expanding gel, along with the inclusion of a blood-clotting agent called chitosan, will help stop the bleeding.Dr. Scott Armen, professor of surgery and neurosurgery at Penn State College of Medicine, said that once developed, the foam could be used by first responders and medics all over the world to help stabilize patients with severe wounds until they can be transported to a hospital.Related StoriesCollagen powder found to be effective in wound closureAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis Industry”The idea is that this foam could be placed in wounds from many different kinds of trauma, whether civilian or on the battlefield,” said Armen, who is also a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve and principal investigator on the project. “We could apply the foam in the field or at the scene, which would stop bleeding quickly, thereby enabling patients to survive prolonged transfer to hospitals or higher levels of care for definitive treatment.”Dr. Jeffrey Catchmark, professor of agricultural and biological engineering, will help develop the foam, which he said will also be bioabsorbable.”After the foam is applied and as the wound heals, natural enzymes in the body will slowly convert the foam into sugar, which will then be metabolized by the body,” Catchmark said.”The structure of the foam will also allow it to slowly transition into an insoluble gel,” added Catchmark. “This is an advantage because it allows the wound to heal without being damaged by the foam, and if the foam needs to be removed, it will not injure the wound site like conventional gauze bandages.”Dr. Melissa Linskey, resident surgeon at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, will help Armen develop and plan the experiments to test the foam as she continues her training to become a trauma surgeon.”We’re hoping the foam will be a valuable alternative or even a better replacement to similar products that are currently available,” Linskey said. “The wide applicability of the product is exciting, and we’re hoping it will particularly benefit our service men and women on the front lines.”After the foam is developed and tested, the researchers also plan to evaluate its ease of use by first responders and look into developing weather- and fluid-resistant packaging to keep the foam dry while not in use.last_img read more

19 Jul

Combination approach appears to improve chemotherapy response boost antitumor immunity

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 3 2018U of T scientists use nanoparticles to improve chemotherapy response and boost anti-tumor immunity in breast cancerScientists at the University of Toronto’s Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy have seen remarkable success combining tumor modulating nanoparticles with doxorubicin to enhance chemotherapy response in pre-clinical model breast cancer. This combination approach also appears to boost anti-tumor immunity, contributing to the growing excitement surrounding immunotherapy as an avenue to treat cancer. Chemotherapy is a first-line treatment for many cancers; however, the makeup of tumor microenvironments is often a key barrier to the effectiveness of treatment, requiring that patients receive higher doses in order to get the desired result. The adverse effects of repeated high-dose chemotherapy can have significant detrimental effects on a patient’s health, such as damaging healthy tissues and organs, which can themselves be fatal. “The challenge is to find new ways to get better treatment outcomes with lower doses of chemotherapy,” says Xiao Yu (Shirley) Wu, senior investigator and professor at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto. “Our combination approach outlined in this study appears to reduce tumor resistance to doxorubicin, making the chemotherapy effective even at a low dose.” In fact, the research team found that a single treatment with the tumor-modulating nanoparticles and the commonly-used chemotherapy drug led to an astonishing 60 per cent cure rate in the pre-clinical animal models, meaning a complete tumor regression and enhanced life expectancy by five-fold compared to treating with chemotherapy alone. “By using the nanoparticles to target and change the tumor environment before administering drug treatment, we were able to knockout the tumor’s ability to resist the treatment -it’s a game changer,” says Mohammad Ali Amini, first co-author on the study recently published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and a PhD candidate in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy.In 2014, Wu and her team published the first-ever use of the nanoparticles developed specifically to suppress a well-known drug resistance factor called tumor hypoxia, a term used to describe the lack of oxygen in a cancerous tumor and other hypoxia-induced factors. “The nanoparticles we developed are made up of manganese dioxide, an oxide of the nutrient mineral manganese that already exists in our bodies,” Wu explains. “They accumulate in the tumor and remodel the tumor environment by generating oxygen and changing the conditions to such an extent that, the chemotherapy becomes more effective.” While the team anticipated the nanoparticles would improve chemo-drug uptake and efficacy, the strikingly high cure rate was surprising and suggested that the nanoparticles were also triggering an anti-tumor immune response. Intriguingly, a few days after the combination treatment, an increased amount of specific anti-tumor T-cells was found in tumors. The team also re-challenged the cured models with the same type of cancer cells and found that 88 per cent of them showed resistance to new tumor growth. “This means there was an additional, immunity-boosting effect of the treatment,” says Amini, “which made sense because a key feature of nanoparticles is that they increase pH and decrease oxidative stress in the tumor, which also provides better conditions for immune cells to enter the tumor and become more active.” Taking the study one step further, the researchers then collected the anti-tumor T-cells and placed into completely new hosts that were subsequently exposed to the same cancer strain. Strikingly, they found 57 per cent of recipients showed no tumor generation at all. “This means the T-cells were effectively fighting the breast cancer strain and that the immunity was actually transferred from a donor to a receiver,” says Wu. “It was very exciting that a single combination treatment could produce T-cells for immunotherapy.” While very promising, these novel findings will need to be validated using different pre-clinical models and by further investigating the exact mechanisms and pathways that led to the initial cure rate and immunity-boosting response. “Once these are better understood, we can move on to designing a more clinically applicable treatment approach,” says Wu. Source:https://pharmacy.utoronto.ca/last_img read more

19 Jul

Study finds 43 drop in stroke rate

first_img Source:https://www.kcl.ac.uk/lsm/schools/population-health-and-environmental-sciences/newsrecords/number-of-people-having-strokes-falls-by-43.aspx Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 15 2018Research from the School of Population Health and Environmental Sciences has shown that the number of people having strokes has fallen 43% between 2000 and 2015.Stroke is a serious condition that occurs when blood supply to part of the brain is cut off. Strokes are thought to affect 100,000 people per year in the UK – around one person every five minutes.The team analyzed data on over 3,000 incidences of ischaemic stroke – one caused by a blood clot, between 2000 and 2015Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsThe team behind the research attribute the 43% drop in stroke rate to a range of factors, including improved prevention measures, such as medication like statins. The reduction in the rates of smoking and drinking is also an important factor.The research, published in PLOS Medicine, showed that although the rate in the population overall had decreased, there had only been a small relative decrease in stroke rates in the black population in south London. This may be due to higher levels of high blood pressure and diabetes seen in black patients, as these conditions can increase people’s risk of stroke.The study also found that across the population, people who had strokes tended to have them younger, with a decrease in the average age at first stroke from 72.3 in 2000-2003, to 69.3 in 2012-15.The study used data from the South London Stroke Register, which has been collecting data on stroke in south London since 1995. The register is a collaboration between King’s College London and Guy’s and St Thomas’ and covers a population of over 350,000 people.Professor Charles Wolfe OBE, Head of School, School of Population Health & Environmental Sciences, set up the register to provide reliable information about the numbers of strokes occurring and the immediate and long term consequences of the disease, to assess the quality of stroke care, and to test new ways of providing care.last_img read more

19 Jul

Researchers reveal previously unknown genetic effect that can raise or reduce risk

first_img Source:https://uahs.arizona.edu/news/ua-researchers-help-discover-genetic-factor-can-help-or-hurt-risk-heart-disease Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 28 2018Atherosclerotic disease, the slow and silent hardening and narrowing of the arteries, is a leading cause of mortality worldwide, responsible for more than 15 million deaths each year, including an estimated 610,000 people in the United States.Now, researchers may know one more reason why some people are more prone to develop the disease. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of physicians, geneticists and biologists — including members of the University of Arizona — describe a previously unknown genetic effect that either can raise or reduce the risk of coronary artery disease or ischemic stroke.”People with the beneficial version of the genetic factor we discovered have less inflammatory, or less activated, cells lining the blood vessels,” said Casey Romanoski, PhD, an assistant professor of cellular and molecular medicine at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson who co-authored the study. “It basically means they will be more resistant to building up plaque in their blood vessels.”In collaboration with researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center, the team found that a common sequence variant in regulatory DNA — known as rs17114036 and located on chromosome 1p32.2 — benefits the vascular endothelium, the cells that line the interior of blood vessels.The endothelium helps smooth and speed blood flow through complex vascular intersections, places where branches or bifurcations disrupt the flow from an artery to two smaller vessels. When the flow is smooth and in one direction, the endothelium is calm; when the flow is disturbed, it leads to chronic local inflammation and formation of atherosclerotic lesions that cause heart attacks and strokes.Related StoriesFungal infection study identifies specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong peopleNew study identifies eight genetic variants associated with anorexia nervosaLiving a healthy lifestyle may help offset genetic risk of dementiaThe research team found that rs17114036 modifies how blood flow patterns impact inflammation, which can change an individual’s risk of cardiovascular disease. However, only about 5 percent of the population has the protective genetic factor.These people “have won the genetic lottery,” said Yun Fang, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago and senior author of the study.For the other 95 percent of the population, things are slightly worse. Like 19 out of 20 people, “I carry the risk allele,” Dr. Fang said. “It increases endothelial response to blood flow disturbance, raising the risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke.”The PNAS study demonstrates that a genetic variant can influence important endothelial function and that genetic variants contribute to individual variation, such as coronary artery disease susceptibility.For the University of Chicago researchers, the next step may be the development of nanoparticles, or ultra-small particles that can replicate the benefits of rs17114036.”Atherosclerosis happens where there is disturbed (blood) flow,” Dr. Fang explained. “If we can make endothelial cells feel like they are exposed to unidirectional flow, there should be less atherosclerosis.”Dr. Romanoski, who specializes in genetics and genomic analysis and is a member of the UA BIO5 Institute, plans to continue linking genetics to various diseases, particularly those associated with the heart and lungs.last_img read more

18 Jul

Study of Millennials highlights social media behaviors linked with major depression

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 9 2019Certain social media factors were linked with major depressive disorder (MDD) in a Journal of Applied Biobehavioural Research study of Millennials.In the study of 504 Millennials who actively use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and/or Snapchat, individuals who met the criteria for MDD scored higher on the Social Media Addiction scale,were more likely to compare themselves to others better off than they were, and indicated that they would be more bothered by being tagged in unflattering pictures. Regarding social interactions, those with MDD were less likely to post pictures of themselves along with other people and reported fewer followers.”While this study highlights social media behaviors that are associated with major depression, it is important to recognize that social media use can offer many positive benefits, including fostering social support,” said co-author Dr. Krista Howard, of Texas State University. “The key is for individuals to develop an awareness of how they currently use social media and to determine what changes could be made in their social media use to reduce the behaviors associated with psychological distress. Some changes could include reducing the time spent on social media, unfollowing individuals or groups that cause distress, or limiting online social comparisons.”​ Source:https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/journal-applied-biobehavioral-research/negative-social-media-behaviors-may-be-associatlast_img read more

18 Jul

New type of cooling vest can improve athletes performance in hot conditions

first_imgBecause our body temperature is usually around 37°C, if your body temperature increases over 40°C that is a very big problem.” In the future, Hasegawa would like to test this technology with people with disabilities who might find it more difficult to regulate body temperature. Source:Hiroshima UniversityJournal reference:Hasegawa, H. et al. (2019) Wearing a Cooling Vest During Half-Time Improves Intermittent Exercise in the Heat. Frontiers in Physiology. doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2019.00711. Related StoriesCombining aerobic exercise and resistance training helps obese older adults preserve muscle massAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairDehydration, decreased performance and decreased brain function are the dangers faced when our core body temperature climbs too high.To help combat this, researchers from Hiroshima University collaborated with a Japanese sportswear company Mizuno to test a new type of cooling vest. The cooling vest is filled with ice packs and features a collar that can also cool the neck. The aim of the vest is to cool the athletes’ upper-body skin which can decrease heart rate and temperature of their neck and skin.Hasegawa recruited athletes from the Hiroshima University football team to test the vest. Participants exercised for 30 minutes followed by 15 minutes of rest, with and without the cooling vest, then exercised for a final 30 minutes in a format similar to a soccer match. The athletes who wore the vest at half-time showed increased performance in the second half. They also said that they felt more comfortable in the second half, an important factor as comfort and relaxation during half time is important to avoid stress during a game.This research is not just applicable to athletes but to people that exercise in hot conditions. If you don’t have access to a cooling vest Hasegawa suggests a combination of external and internal cooling: Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 17 2019Strategies to cope with body heat in sports is a pressing issue. The Tokyo Olympics will be held in the hot and muggy Japanese summer where the ambient temperature is expected to be above 33°C. Athletes have to worry about performing under pressure of the high-stakes competition but also now have to deal with a very hot and humid climate. The 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar will also have high temperatures and athletes must use cooling strategies during the competition. Professor Hiroshi Hasegawa of the Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University says that this is an increasing problem for athletes due to both competition timing and increased temperatures due to global warming.Illness due to heat can have serious consequences outlines Hasegawa: Normally to avoid the heat illness it’s better not to do any exercise. But if you have to exercise in the heat it’s better not to drink water, it’s better to drink sports drink because they contain electrolytes and some energy… Cooling your body is very important, especially the upper body.”Professor Hiroshi Hasegawalast_img read more

18 Jul

Stem cell stimulation shows promise as potential stroke treatment

first_imgJul 3 2019Stem cell stimulation shows promise as a potential noninvasive stroke treatment, according to research in mice published in JNeurosci. If extended to humans, this technique could greatly improve patients’ quality of life. Related StoriesRetina can restructure itself following gene therapyBrain stimulation accelerates visual learning and recoveryStudy reveals long-term behavioral deficits after developmental Zika infectionLing Wei, Shang Ping Yu, and colleagues at Emory University injected neural stem cells into the brains of mice after a stroke and activated the cells through nasal administration of a protein. The stem cells activated by this new, noninvasive technique called optochemogenetics grew healthier and formed more connections compared to the stem cells that did not receive stimulation. Additionally, the mice that received both stem cells and stimulation displayed the most recovery, with some behaviors returning to pre-stroke levels.The combination of stem cell injection and stimulation increased the likelihood of a successful stroke recovery in mice. Instead of just injecting stem cells in the damaged area of the brain, following up with stimulation creates an ideal environment for the cells to develop and form connections with surrounding neurons. Source:Society for NeuroscienceJournal reference:Wei, L. et al. (2019) Optochemogenetics Stimulation of Transplanted iPS-NPCs Enhances Neuronal Repair and Functional Recovery after Ischemic Stroke. Journal of Neuroscience. doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2010-18.2019.last_img read more

18 Jul

BMW takes full control of carsharing platform DriveNow

The Munich-based group will pay Sixt some 209 million euros ($259 million) for its 50-percent stake in DriveNow.Regulators are expected to approve or reject the deal by June.”With DriveNow as a wholly-owned subsidiary, we have all options for continued strategic development of our services,” BMW board member Peter Schwarzenbauer said in a statement.Sixt’s stake in the service had long been seen as the main hurdle to merging it with Mercedes-Benz maker Daimler’s rival Car2Go platform.Launched in 2011, DriveNow offers a fleet of around 6,000 BMW and Mini vehicles in 13 European cities, with more than one million customers on its books.Meanwhile, Car2Go’s 14,000-strong fleet—mostly made up of Daimler’s ultra-compact Smart cars—serves 2.6 million users in 25 cities spread across three continents. Citation: BMW takes full control of car-sharing platform DriveNow (2018, January 29) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-bmw-full-car-sharing-platform-drivenow.html German high-end carmaker BMW said Monday it had bought partner Sixt’s share in car-sharing platform DriveNow, stoking speculation a merger with a competing service from Daimler may lie ahead. Explore further Key ride-hailing companies who are changing the industry © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A merger may be lurking behind the next bend read more

18 Jul

Googles digital assistant branches out to Nest camera

The virtual assistant is being offered to owners of the Nest Cam IQ in a free update rolling out Wednesday. The move comes just two weeks after Nest moved back under Google’s direct control after spending nearly 2 1/2 years as a separate company owned by the same parent, Alphabet Inc.The $300 Nest Cam will give Google another potentially valuable earhole in its battle with Amazon and Apple to build digital command centers in people’s home.That ambition has already spurred warnings from privacy watchdogs about the potential for internet-connected devices being used as surveillance tools.Google’s assistant already can be used to control Nest’s cameras and internet-connected thermostat through its internet-connected speaker, Home, and smartphones running on its Android software. This will be the first time that people will be able to interact with the digital concierge through a security camera.The assistant is only supposed to be activated with keywords such as “OK, Google,” although there have been instances when the Home speaker has been caught listening when it was supposed to be turned off.Even if Google’s assistant doesn’t eavesdrop, its presence on an indoor security camera is likely to focus more attention on the handling and protection of the data collected through internet-connected devices.Privacy watchdogs are particularly worried that Google eventually may use some of the information collected from devices inside homes to get a better understanding of a person’s specific interests so it can sell ads for products that the targeted individual might like.Google already has used the data that it collects through its ubiquitous search engine and other free services such as maps and email to build the internet’s most lucrative internet marketing network.Since Google bought it for $3.2 billion, Nest has steadfastly maintained that it doesn’t share its customers’ personal information with Google’s ad network.But a patent application filed by Google in 2016 floated the possibility of using the video recorded by security cameras to deliver ads based on the kinds of furnishings and other merchandise already in people’s homes. This July 25, 2017, file frame grab from video shows the Nest Cam IQ camera. Google’s voice-activated assistant is branching out to Nest’s deluxe security camera. The virtual assistant is being offered to owners of the Nest Cam IQ in a free update rolling out Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Ryan Nakashima, File) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Smart home unit Nest is spun back into Google Citation: Google’s digital assistant branches out to Nest camera (2018, February 21) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-google-digital-camera.html Google’s voice-activated assistant is branching out to Nest’s deluxe security camera in an expansion that may amplify the privacy concerns surrounding internet-connected microphones. read more

18 Jul

Disney Animation to premiere first VR short at SIGGRAPH 2018

first_img Cycles, an experimental film directed by Jeff Gipson, centers around the true meaning of creating a home and the life it holds inside its walls. The idea for the film is personal, inspired by Gipson’s childhood spending time with his grandparents and creating memories in their home, and later, having to move them to an assisted living residence.”Every house has a story unique to the people, the characters who live there,” says Gipson. “We wanted to create a story in this single place and be able to have the viewer witness life happening around them. It is an emotionally driven film, expressing the real ups and downs, the happy and sad moments in life.”For Cycles, Gipson also drew from his past life as an architect, having spent several years designing skate parks, and from his passion for action sports, including freestyle BMX. In Los Angeles, where Gipson lives, it is not unusual to find homes with an empty swimming pool reserved for skating or freestyle biking. Part of the pitch for Cycles came out of Gipson’s experience riding in these empty pools and being curious about the homes attached to them, the families who lived there, and the memories they made.SIGGRAPH attendees will have the opportunity to experience Cycles at the Immersive Pavilion, a new space for this year’s conference. The Pavilion is devoted exclusively to virtual, augmented, and mixed reality and will contain: the VR Theater, a storytelling extravaganza that is part of the Computer Animation Festival; the Vrcade, a space for VR, AR, and MR games or experiences; and the well-known Village, for showcasing large-scale projects. SIGGRAPH 2018, held 12-16 August in Vancouver, British Columbia, is an annual gathering that showcases the world’s leading professionals, academics, and creative minds at the forefront of computer graphics and interactive techniques.The production team completed Cycles in four months with about 50 collaborators as part of a professional development program at the studio. A key difference in VR filmmaking includes getting creative with how to translate a story to the VR “screen.” Pre-visualizing the narrative, for one, was a challenge. Rather than traditional storyboarding, Gipson and his team instead used a mix of Quill VR painting techniques and motion capture to “storyboard” Cycles, incorporating painters and artists to generate sculptures or 3-D models of characters early on and draw scenes for the VR space. The creators also got innovative with the use of light and color saturation in scenes to help guide the user’s eyes during the film.”What’s cool for VR is that we are really on the edge of trying to figure out what it is and how to tell stories in this new medium,” says Gipson. “In VR, you can look anywhere and really be transported to a different world, experience it from different angles, and see every detail. We want people watching to feel alive and feel emotion, and give them a true cinematic experience.”This is Gipson’s VR directorial debut. He joined Walt Disney Animation Studios in 2013, serving as a lighting artist on Disney favorites like Frozen, Zootopia, and Moana. Of getting to direct the studio’s first VR short, he says, “VR is an amazing technology and a lot of times the technology is what is really celebrated. We hope more and more people begin to see the emotional weight of VR films, and with Cycles in particular, we hope they will feel the emotions we aimed to convey with our story.” Provided by Association for Computing Machinery Walt Disney Animation Studios will debut its first ever virtual reality short film at SIGGRAPH 2018, and the hope is viewers will walk away feeling connected to the characters as equally as they will with the VR technology involved in making the film. New app offers interactive experiences for Disney guests More information: s2018.siggraph.org/attend/register/center_img Citation: Disney Animation to premiere first VR short at SIGGRAPH 2018 (2018, July 19) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-disney-animation-premiere-vr-short.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

18 Jul

VRTIGO lets you test your nerves in virtual reality

first_img Provided by Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne Why do some people react more strongly than others when faced with the unknown? Researchers at EPFL’s Laboratory of Behavioral Genetics, headed by Professor Carmen Sandi, have set out to learn more with a new virtual reality program. Their system evaluates how users’ personality traits and prior experience influence their responses to anxiety-inducing situations. Designed to be tested on a large sample of volunteers, it will be available for visitors to try out during the Geneva International Film Festival on 5–10 November, where it will be featured in the Digital Out of Competition category. Virtual reality ‘out-of-body experience’ reduces fear of death in volunteers Citation: VRTIGO lets you test your nerves in virtual reality (2018, November 5) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-vrtigo-nerves-virtual-reality.html Scary, but funThe developers want to keep the surprise under wraps, but the program’s name – VRTIGO – gives an idea of what users can expect. Volunteers will be asked to don an immersive headset and will be led to a sectioned-off area where the experiment will take place. The program will transport them to a virtual world that appears surprisingly realistic.”Even though users consciously know it’s a virtual experience, the perception they get from their senses tells them otherwise. And their bodies react accordingly – their palms start sweating and they start walking very carefully,” say João Rodrigues and Erik Studer, two of the researchers who developed the program. The virtual walk into the unknown is perfectly safe and designed to be fun, but is nonetheless limited to adults over 18. “We’ve gotten excellent feedback from people who’ve tried it,” adds Studer. “And if the experience starts feeling too intense, users can just close their eyes or take off the headset and their sensory perceptions will return to normal.”Crucial data for researchThe VRTIGO experience, although amusing, provides valuable data for scientists studying human anxiety. The data are completely anonymous; volunteers are asked to fill out a short questionnaire on their antecedents and emotional state. During the experiment, the system’s sensors relay information about users’ physiological responses, while accelerometers track their body positions, movements and the directions in which they are looking. Samples are also taken of users’ saliva to determine their cortisol levels – an indicator of how much stress they feel.”These tests carried out among the general public will give us data from people of many different ages and backgrounds, and help advance our research on this issue,” says Studer. The research team hopes to publish their findings in 2019. Explore further More information: For more information, see 2018.giff.ch/en/events/vrtigo-en/ EPFL researchers have developed a virtual-reality program that examines how users – equipped with a headset and sensors – react to a vertiginous stroll. The system will be presented at the Geneva International Film Festival on 5–10 November. Credit: Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

18 Jul

Securing IoT connections by edge computing

first_img A new security solution for protecting the data between Internet of Things (IoT) devices has been developed by a team of researchers from Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore, according to a study published in the journal IEEE Network.The team, which includes the information security expert Dr. Jemin Lee of the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), developed a ‘reconfigurable security framework for IoT (ReSIoT).’ ReSIoT overcomes many of the security challenges faced by IoT devices today, including high computation costs, low flexibility in security key management, and low compatibility in deploying new security algorithms. The Internet of things encompasses a wide range of devices that are connected to the Internet and can also communicate with each other. Homes increasingly contain appliances that can be remotely controlled from a smartphone app, web or voice-based services, from security cameras or baby monitors, to sound systems, lighting and thermostats. Security systems for the Internet of things need to support a wide range of device types and communication standards. Devices need to be cost-effective, making them generally resource-constrained, yet they still need to perform advanced cryptographic algorithms to protect the passwords and data they process and store.ReSIoT employs a concept called edge computing, which allows the data produced by IoT devices to be processed at a device closer to the user – for example, a wireless router at home or a road side unit in vehicular networks – rather than being computed at data centres or in the cloud. The locally-placed edge device is called a ‘security agent’ and is responsible for managing the security of the local IoT devices connected to it.The construction of ReSIoT can simplify the key management across multiple IoT applications, and also be used for advanced security protection mechanisms such as anonymous authentication and attribute based access control for data protection. The team tested their system and found it reduced processing time, compared to currently available security solutions, by offloading high complexity computations from smaller IoT devices to a security agent. ReSIoT is expected to provide security protection for IoT devices with better flexibility and scalability in hardware and software. “The reconfigurable security framework paves a new way to strengthen IoT security by edge computing,” the team concludes in its study. A new reconfigurable security solution outperforms currently available ones in protecting Internet of things (IoT) devices and data by exploiting edge computing. More information: Ruei-Hau Hsu et al. Reconfigurable Security: Edge-Computing-Based Framework for IoT, IEEE Network (2018). DOI: 10.1109/MNET.2018.1700284 Credit: CC0 Public Domain This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by DGIST Explore further Microsoft turns to former rival to improve internet security Citation: Securing IoT connections by edge computing (2018, November 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-iot-edge.htmllast_img read more

18 Jul

Gone in 6 minutes an Ethiopian Airlines jets final journey

first_imgThe pilots were young, too, and between them they had a scant 159 hours of flying time on the Max.The captain, Getachew, was just 29 but had accumulated more than 8,000 hours of flying since completing work at the airline’s training academy in 2010. He had flown more than 1,400 hours on Boeing 737s but just 103 hours on the Max. That may not be surprising, given that Ethiopian Airlines had just five of the planes, including ET-AVJ.The co-pilot, Ahmed Nur Mohammod Nur, was only 25 and was granted a license to fly the 737 and the Max on Dec. 12 of last year. He had logged just 361 flight hours—not enough to be hired as a pilot at a U.S. airline. Of those hours, 207 were on 737s, including 56 hours on Max jets.Thursday’s preliminary report found that both pilots performed all the procedures recommended by Boeing on the March 10 flight but still could not control the jet.While Boeing continues to work on its software update, Max jets remain grounded worldwide. The CEO said the company is taking “a comprehensive, disciplined approach” to fixing the flight-control software.But some critics, including Hall, the former NTSB chairman, question why the work has taken so long.”Don’t you think if Boeing knew what the fix was, we would have the fix by now?” he said. “They said after the Lion Air accident there was going to be a fix, yet there was a second accident with no fix. Now, in response to the worldwide reaction, the plane is grounded and there is still not a fix.” In this March 11, 2019, file photo, wreckage is piled at the crash scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, Ethiopia. Pilots of the Ethiopian Airlines flight encountered problems with their new Boeing jetliner from nearly the moment they roared down the runway and took off. A preliminary report on Thursday, April 4, 2019, by Ethiopian investigators reveals a minute-by-minute narrative of the gripping and confusing scene in the cockpit. (AP Photo/Mulugeta Ayene, File) Jim Hall, a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, said the preliminary findings add urgency to re-examine the way that the Federal Aviation Administration uses employees of aircraft manufacturers to conduct safety-related tasks, including tests and inspections—a decades-old policy that raises questions about the agency’s independence and is now under review by the U.S. Justice Department, the Transportation Department’s inspector general and congressional committees.”It is clear now that the process itself failed to produce a safe aircraft,” Hall said. “The focus now is to see if there were steps that were skipped or tests that were not properly done.”The 33-page preliminary report, which is subject to change in the coming months, is based on information from the plane’s flight data and cockpit voice recorders, the so-called black boxes. It includes a minute-by-minute narrative of a gripping and confusing scene in the cockpit. In tis Wednesday, March 13, 2019 file photo, a grieving relative who lost his wife in the crash is helped by a member of security forces and others at the scene where the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed shortly after takeoff on Sunday killing all 157 on board, near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, in Ethiopia. Pilots of the Ethiopian Airlines flight encountered problems with their new Boeing jetliner from nearly the moment they roared down the runway and took off. Ethiopian authorities issued a preliminary report Thursday, April 4, 2019, on the March 10 crash. (AP Photo/Mulugeta Ayene, File) Just one minute into Flight 302 from Addis Ababa to Nairobi in neighboring Kenya, the captain, Yared Getachew, reported that they were having flight-control problems.Then the anti-stall system kicked in and pushed the nose of the plane down for nine seconds. Instead of climbing, the plane descended slightly. Audible warnings—”Don’t Sink”—sounded in the cockpit. The pilots fought to turn the nose of the plane up, and briefly they were able to resume climbing.But the automatic anti-stall system pushed the nose down again, triggering more squawks of “Don’t Sink” from the plane’s ground-proximity warning system. From nearly the moment they roared down the runway and took off in their new Boeing jetliner, the pilots of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 encountered problems with the plane. © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Ethiopian Airlines says pilots got appropriate training This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Following a procedure that Boeing reiterated after the Lion Air crash, the Ethiopian pilots flipped two switches and disconnected the anti-stall system, then tried to regain control. They asked to return to the Addis Ababa airport, but were continuing to struggle getting the plane to gain altitude.Then they broke with Boeing procedure and returned power to controls including the anti-stall system, perhaps hoping to use power to adjust a tail surface that controls the pitch up or down of a plane, or maybe out of sheer desperation.One final time, the automated system kicked in, pushing the plane into a nose dive, according to the report.A half-minute later, the cockpit voice recording ended, the plane crashed, and all 157 people on board were killed. The plane’s impact left a crater 10 meters deep.The Max is Boeing’s newest version of its workhorse single-aisle jetliner, the 737, which dates to the 1960s. Fewer than 400 Max jets have been sent to airlines around the world, but Boeing has taken orders for 4,600 more.Boeing delivered this particular plane, tail number ET-AVJ, to Ethiopian Airlines in November. By the day of Flight 302, it had made nearly 400 flights and been in the air for 1,330 hours—still very new by airline standards. In this Monday, March 11, 2019 file photo, rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Pilots of the Ethiopian Airlines flight encountered problems with their new Boeing jetliner from nearly the moment they roared down the runway and took off. Ethiopian authorities issued a preliminary report Thursday, April 4, 2019, on the March 10 crash. (AP Photo/Mulugeta Ayene, File) Almost immediately, a device called a stick shaker began vibrating the captain’s control column, warning him that the plane might be about to stall and fall from the sky.For six minutes, the pilots were bombarded by alarms as they fought to fly the plane, at times pulling back in unison on their control columns in a desperate attempt to keep the huge jet aloft.Ethiopian authorities issued a preliminary report Thursday on the March 10 crash that killed 157 people. They found that a malfunctioning sensor sent faulty data to the Boeing 737 Max 8’s anti-stall system and triggered a chain of events that ended in a crash so violent it reduced the plane to shards and pieces. The pilots’ struggle, and the tragic ending, mirrored an Oct. 29 crash of a Lion Air Max 8 off the coast of Indonesia, which killed 189 people.The anti-stall system, called MCAS, automatically lowers the plane’s nose under some circumstances to prevent an aerodynamic stall. Boeing acknowledged that a sensor in the Ethiopian Airlines jet malfunctioned, triggering MCAS when it was not needed. The company repeated that it is working on a software upgrade to fix the problem in its best-selling plane.”It’s our responsibility to eliminate this risk,” CEO Dennis Muilenburg said in a video. “We own it, and we know how to do it.” In tis Saturday, March 23, 2019 file photo, an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 sits grounded at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Pilots of the Ethiopian Airlines flight encountered problems with their new Boeing jetliner from nearly the moment they roared down the runway and took off. A preliminary report on Thursday, April 4, 2019, by Ethiopian investigators reveals a minute-by-minute narrative of the gripping and confusing scene in the cockpit before the March 10 crash. (AP Photo/Mulugeta Ayene, File) Citation: Gone in 6 minutes: an Ethiopian Airlines jet’s final journey (2019, April 5) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-minutes-ethiopian-airlines-jet-journey.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

18 Jul

Facebook bans UK farright groups

first_imgSocial media giant Facebook on Thursday banned various far-right British groups including the English Defence League from its network for promoting hate and violence. Citation: Facebook bans UK far-right groups (2019, April 18) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-facebook-uk-far-right-groups.html Facebook to tighten live stream access after mosque attacks Other groups kicked off both Facebook or Instagram include Knights Templar International, Britain First, the British National Party (BNP) and the National Front.The tech titan banned the groups for contravening its policy forbidding “terrorist activity, organised hate, mass or serial murder, human trafficking or organised violence or criminal activity”.”Individuals and organisations who spread hate, or attack or call for the exclusion of others on the basis of who they are, have no place on Facebook,” a spokeswoman for Facebook said.”We ban those who proclaim a violent or hateful mission or are engaged in acts of hate or violence. “Posts and other content which expresses praise or support for these figures and groups will also be banned.”Former BNP leader Nick Griffin and Britain First leaders Paul Golding and Jayda Fransen have also been banned in the crackdown. © 2019 AFPcenter_img The US tech giant said indiviuals or groups spreading hate “have no place on Facebook” Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

18 Jul

Distracted Kindergartners May Earn Less As Adults

first_img Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoGundry MD SupplementsTop Cardiologist: This One Thing Will Properly Flush Out Your BowelsGundry MD SupplementsUndoClassmatesSearch For Any High School Yearbook, It’s Free.ClassmatesUndo If you’re wondering why your salary is so low, it bears asking: Were you inattentive as a kindergartner? According to a 30-year study, children who were distracted kindergartners earned less money, on average, in their early 30s than their more attentive classmates did. While these findings may seem discouraging (after all, aren’t kindergartners known for being rambunctious?), the researchers see it another way. “Early behaviors are modifiable,” they wrote in the study, “making them key targets for early intervention.” [11 Facts Every Parent Should Know About Their Baby’s Brain]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65752-kindergarten-behaviors-linked-to-salary.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  In other words, if this behavior is caught early enough, perhaps children can learn to become more attentive over time, which could help them later in life, the researchers said. Even so, these results are correlational, meaning it’s not clear if one feature actually causes another. And, according to an expert not involved in the study, it’s unclear why the link between inattention and lower salary exists. Distracted kids In the study, researchers pulled data from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Kindergarten Children to see what behavioral ratings teachers gave 2,850 kindergarteners living in Canada. Nearly all of the children (96%) were white and ages 5 or 6 when the ratings were taken in 1985. Children were rated as inattentive if they met the following criteria: They lacked concentration, were easily distracted, had their head in the clouds and lacked persistence. Then, about 30 years later, the researchers took the average of these children’s tax returns filed from 2013 to 2015. After adjusting for participant IQ and family background (which included factors such as the parent’s education levels, ages, employment status and whether the family structure was intact or not), the researchers found a significant pay gap between the inattentive and attentive students. At the time of follow up, the average salary for men was $27,500 and $15,200 for women (in U.S. dollars). The teachers had rated the children on a sliding scale; for each 1-unit increase in inattention the children received, the men earned about $1,271 less a year, while the women were paid $924 less annually. Moreover, kindergarten ratings of physical aggression (fighting, bullying, kicking and biting) and opposition (disobeying, refusing to share materials, blaming others, being inconsiderate and acting irritable) were associated with lower earnings (about $700 less annually), but only for the boys. On the flip side, kindergarten boys who were more prosocial (behaviors that included stopping quarrels, inviting bystanders to join in a game and helping people who were hurt) earned an average of $476 more a year as adults than less prosocial boys, the researchers found. “The association between childhood behaviors and future earnings is not surprising,” the researchers wrote in the study. “Children who fight with their peers, are careless in their work, do not attend to instructions and do not complete assignments are likely to underperform in school and subsequently in the workplace as adults, which may be associated with lower earnings.” [5 Ways to Talk to Your Kids About Bullying] An outside take Don’t banish rule-breaking Johnny to the low-wage bin just yet, though. This study has several strengths and a few weaknesses, said Jessica Agnew-Blais, a medical research council postdoctoral research fellow at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre at King’s College London, who wasn’t involved with the research. It’s important to know that “this association between childhood behavior and adult earnings can be identified quite early in schooling — already by kindergarten,” especially because “this could allow for better early intervention,” Agnew-Blais told Live Science in an email. However, the study leaves many questions unanswered. For instance, “What level of inattention symptoms mean a child should screen positive, i.e., receive an intervention?” Agnew-Blais asked. “Would there be any negative effects of being identified as needing additional support, for example stigma? … These questions go beyond the scope of the current study, but would be important to consider if children were to be screened for these problems.” It would also be helpful to know the exact cause of this link between inattention and lower earnings later in life, she said. For example, “Is it through peer relationships? Educational problems? Poor social support? Poorer mental health in adulthood?” Agnew-Blais asked. “This is not really a weakness of this study, per se, but an area for future research.” She added that while some support programs — such as Sure Start in the United Kingdom and Head Start in the United States — indicate that early intervention can help children later in life, these types of programs aren’t always available. “Sadly, funding is being cut for exactly these types of programs in many countries,” Agnew-Blais said. The study was published online yesterday (June 19) in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. 25 Scientific Tips For Raising Happy & Healthy Kids 9 Weird Ways Kids Can Get Hurt Top 10 Stigmatized Health Disorderslast_img read more

17 Jul

Kerala Tourism has defeated odds to bounce back after floods Alphons

first_imgKerala SHARE The tourism industry in Kerala has showed its strong character post the devastating floods and it has made an astounding revival, Minister of State for Tourism (Independent Charge), K J Alphons, has said.“I give emphasis on Kerala Tourism’s ability to recoup after a severe natural calamity as an epitome wherever I go. We bounced back, defeating all the never-seen-before challenges. It gives a positive sign that tourism has regained its vigour post the floods,” he remarked.The Minister made this observation while inaugurating an exhibition of stalls and pavilions at the tenth edition of Kerala Travel Mart (KTM) at Samudrika and Sagara Convention Centre, Willingdon Island, here on Friday.He also inaugurated a pavilion on Responsible Tourism, put up by Kerala’s Department of Tourism for the occasion.With its focus on the Malabar as a core theme, the four-day KTM, which was inaugurated by Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Thursday, emphasised the need to safeguard the ecology of prime destinations and promote Responsible Tourism.KTM-2018 features 1,600 buyers, one-third of them from 66 foreign countries. Public-private participation is a key feature of the conclave, with participation by delegates from the fields of travel and tourism, hotels and resorts, home-stays, houseboats, Ayurveda centres and cultural organisations.The mart provides a platform to world-class buyers and sellers to interact and promote businesses, giving a fresh impetus to Kerala’s tourism industry that generates an annual turnover of Rs 34,000 crore and provides employment to 25 lakh people.KTM, with 325 sellers in 400 stalls, has 1,635 buyers who are top functionaries of firms in the tourism industry within the country and outside. There are 545 foreign buyers from 66 countries, including the US, Russia, Japan, China, Australia and Britain. The number of domestic buyers stands at 1,090. Kerala Floods COMMENT Published oncenter_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL tourism and leisure September 28, 2018 COMMENTSlast_img read more

17 Jul

SC asks Centre to file affidavit on steps taken to appoint Lokpal

first_imgJanuary 04, 2019 Published on SHARE COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL The Supreme Court on Friday directed the Centre to place on affidavit steps taken since September last year to set up a search committee for the Lokpal.The apex court asked Attorney General K K Venugopal to file the affidavit on the matter by January 17. “You have to ensure on affidavit the steps taken on the issue of setting up of a search committee for the Lokpal,” a bench comprising Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi and Justice S K Kaul said.When the Attorney General said that since the last order of September 2018, several steps have been taken, the bench asked him, “What all have you done till date. So much time is being taken”.When the Attorney General reiterated that several steps have been taken, the bench shot back “bring everything on record what you have done since September 2018”.Advocate Prashant Bhushan, appearing for the NGO Common Cause, which has been pursuing the issue of Lokpal, said the government has not even made public the members of the search committee on its website. The top court had on July 24 last year rejected as “wholly unsatisfactory” the Centre’s submission on the issue of setting up of a search committee for the Lokpal and demanded a “better affidavit” within four weeks.The direction had followed a submission by the Attorney General that the selection committee members comprising Prime Minister Narendra Modi, then Chief Justice of India Dipak Misra, Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan and eminent jurist Mukul Rohatgi had met on July 19 last year to deliberate upon names for members of the search committee.The selection panel also took note that the search committee is to comprise a minimum of seven people (including chairperson) with experience in anti-corruption policy, public administration, vigilance, policy making, finance including insurance and banking, law and management, etc, Venugopal had said.Besides, 50 per cent of the members of the search committee will be from Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes, Other Backward Classes, Minorities and Women, he said. COMMENTSlast_img read more

17 Jul

Karnataka mulls geographical indication policy

first_img The Karnataka government is planning to come out with a GI (geographical indication) Policy in the State, according to an official of the State government.In an informal chat with mediapersons on the sidelines of an interactive meeting with exporters at the Kanara Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KCCI) in Mangaluru on Friday, SR Satheesha, Managing Director of the Bengaluru-based Visvesvaraya Trade Promotion Centre (a Karnataka government organisation), said the State has 45 GI products in different sectors, including handicraft, horticulture, etc. Karnataka has maximum number of GI products among other states in the country.Stating that VTPC (Visvesvaraya Trade Promotion Centre ) is working on a strategy document on GI products in the State, he said: “We will have focussed meeting with the respective GI holders in the state. We will visit them to understand their issues, and to provide interventions wherever needed.”Highlighting the instances of gradual diminishing of some GI products in the State, he said the number of artisans producing ‘Udupi sari’ is coming down gradually. In such a situation, GI policy will help provide focused training programmes and skill upgradation facilities to the stakeholders of GI products.Apart from this, the policy will also want to make GI products competitive in the domestic and international markets. Considering this, plans are there to introduce concepts such as ‘GI tourism’, ‘GI exhibitions’, and ‘GI stores’ at airports, and also to develop ‘GI cluster’ in the State.Asked if any other State has taken initiative to launch a GI policy, he said Karnataka will be the first State to come out with a GI policy.Being niche in their segments, GI products have a lot of potential in the market. Somehow, they are not being marketed properly, Satheesha said. COMMENT May 03, 2019 Published on patent, copyright and trademark SHARE SHARE EMAIL Karnataka COMMENTS SHARElast_img read more

16 Jul

Miss us Twitter hit with hourlong outage

first_img {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} A sign outside of the Twitter office building in San Francisco. Users across the US and elsewhere were unable to access Twitter for about an hour on July 11. — AP Then, shortly before 1pm PT, it was back for many of us. Twitter posted an explanation on its status page blaming an “internal configuration change” that it was fixing.  The model Chrissy Teigen phrased the collective sigh in all caps, tweeting “OH THANK GOD”. Earlier, she turned to Instagram to post what looked very much like a tweet: “TWITTER IS DOWN I DON’T KNOW WHERE ELSE TO SAY THIS AHHHHHH.” How serious she was is in the eyes of the beholder.  The hashtag “TwitterDown” was trending as users recalled their experiences. Some were too young to remember a time when such an outage was a common occurrence.  Outages were so widespread in Twitter’s early years that a cartoon “fail whale” the company displayed during outages came to symbolise Twitter almost as much as its little blue bird icon. The whale was retired in 2013, largely because Twitter didn’t want to be associated with what it represented any more. After all, outages had become far less common.  This time, Twitter’s home page read in part, “Something is technically wrong. Thanks for noticing.” The disruption appeared to affect both web and mobile app users. According to Down Detector, a website that tracks outages, problems were reported from the US, Europe and elsewhere.  Facebook and Instagram have also experienced outages recently, during which time users turned to Twitter to joke and complain. But for the politicians, celebrities and other public figures who use Twitter as their main communications platform – and for the people who follow them – nothing quite compares with the immediate, public nature of the service.  The outage came as President Donald Trump convened a White House conference of like-minded critics of Big Tech. Tech companies such as Twitter weren’t invited. – AP Related News Culture 21h ago Of Nostalgia And Emotional Ties To Stuff Tech News 10 Jul 2019 AirAsia website and app restored after temporary outage Tech News 10 Jul 2019 Apple upgrades MacBook Air and Pro, drops Air’s price by RM550 SAN FRANCISCO: “Miss us?” Twitter tweeted from its official account as the Great Twitter Outage wound down.  We did, apparently.  For nearly an hour on July 11, the service we use to keep up with everything and nothing appeared inaccessible for people around the world, regardless of celebrity status or follower count. We reloaded and reloaded. Some turned to Instagram, Facebook and even LinkedIn to express outrage over the outage.  But it was just not the same.  Related Newslast_img read more